FDC-Texas

Water Conservation and Irrigation

To grow enough food for one person requires 2,000 liters of water per day. Everyone needs it, yet the world has limited freshwater.

It must be protected and treated as the valuable asset it is. Sustainable water usage is one of the primary considerations in every venture that FDC-Texas International becomes involved in.

IRRIGATION AGRICULTURE

Agriculture makes up 70% of water usage on our planet. (“https://www.cargill.com/sustainability/priorities/water”). Over 50% of the world’s food production requires irrigation, with the demand for irrigation increasing daily as pressure is applied for increased food and fiber production.

RAIN-FED AGRICULTURE

Is another source of improving the food security for many nations.

Rain-fed agriculture is another source of improving food security for many nations. Most food grown in poor communities in developing countries is produced through rain-fed agriculture. It produces the bulk of the world’s food (up to 60% of the world’s grains). In small-scale, rain-fed agriculture, small investments for supplemental irrigation and modern techniques can double water production and yields. The potential for improving water productivity is high in rain-fed agricultural regions with an expected 20% of water savings possible over the next decade. FDC offers methods of improving production in these rain-fed agricultural communities.

DRAINAGE

Improper irrigation and lack of drainage can result in the build-up of soil-destroying salts. Over 25% of the world’s irrigated lands are facing reductions in yields and soil quality due to increased salinity and poor drainage. By utilizing state-of-the-art “Irrigation and Drainage Technologies” FDC can do the following: 

–Improve the economic productivity of water – “more crop per drop”. 

–Reduce water losses due to evaporation and seepage by updating outdated systems to modern ones.

–Utilize alternate crops and cultivation methods that extend limited water sources.

–Engineer irrigation practices and drainage systems, enabling farmers to gain higher production with the same water usage. 

–Capture and reuse fresh water, saving water before it flows into “salt sinks” such as salty water bodies or evaporating salt beds. 

–Apply “Cost and Return” rules, done by comparing the economics of crops being produced versus the water consumed. 

–Water conservation education and training, educating local farmers and large production complexes in water-saving techniques, including distribution and conveyance systems.

Water Conservation

Agricultural success hinges on many factors. The number one most common fear is the lack of fresh water. There is a direct correlation between hunger, poverty, and water shortages.

Water shortage can be combated through several methods such as efficient irrigation technology, done by shifting crops irrigated using flood irrigation to more efficient sprinkler, and drip techniques. Applying modern management methods to better manage irrigation systems. Reducing the percentage of lower-value and water-intensive crops to higher-value and water-efficient crops. Finally, applying smart irrigation scheduling to manage and be more precise with water use. 

Incentivization for farmers to implement better water conservation practices can be done through affordable credits and financial risk management mechanisms such as crop insurance.

Irrigation Equipment

FDC offers a wide range of irrigation equipment and technologies. The complete system may include wells, river stations, pumps, generators (if required), conveyance (pipeline or canal), controls and monitoring instrumentation, and field application units.

Irrigation Equipment
 

  • T & L Irrigation Systems
  • Reinke Irrigation Pivots
  • Desert Rain Irrigation
  • Lindsay Zimmatic Pivots
  • Valley Irrigation Systems                          

Typical Drip System Layout

  • Parma Waterlifter Pumps, American Turbine, Johnson Pump
  • Drip Irrigation Services, Big Gun Systems
  • Conveyance Systems, Canal liners, Plastic/steel pipeline